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We are here to help.

stats from Molly Sullivan  
Producers are the lifeblood to our industry and food supply.

Studies show that suicide is more common among farmers than any other job group and twice the rate of military veterans. Know how you can help yourself or others by being aware. Please find the resources needed.

Oregon Wheat is not a crisis center. If you are in need of immediate assistance, reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. An online chat option is also available.



Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network

Agriculture is an occupation full of potential stressors like weather, changing economic markets, animal health and machinery breakdowns. When these start to compound, many farmers experience excessive amounts of stress, making it hard to remain positive and move forward through the hard times.

Due in part to the stresses that are faced, agricultural workers have high rates of suicide. The loss of a spouse, parent, sibling, child or friend can be avoided. If you or someone you know is experiencing excessive stress or thoughts of suicide, please reach out to a confidential crisis support line.


View the Oregon State University Extension Service site HERE.





Other Available Resources

Need Help? Know Someone Who Does?

Crisis Text Line

  • Text HOME to 741741 - The Crisis Text Line provides free support 24 hours a day.
  • Call 800-691-4336 - Avera’s hotline will connect you with a skilled, compassionate mental health professional who can help you navigate whatever you’re experiencing – such as symptoms or signs of anxiety or depression.

Watch this news clip about increased farmer suicides and learn how you can help your neighbors, friends and family.

Mental Health is VITAL.

COVID-19 brings new challenges, awareness to rural mental health crisis
05/27/20 6:40 AM By Hannah Pagel
View AGRI-PULSE Article

COVID-19 brought a wave of new economic challenges that producers are still working through. But for beginning farmers, the pandemic has added a new level of stress that's making it that much harder to get started in agriculture, echoing the psychological toll of the 1980s.

“There's a lot at stake in the first place with getting started in farming, especially trying to get started as a young farmer. But for me, I bought my farm and two weeks later the coronavirus hit and everything is completely in the tank,” said Lillie Beringer, who closed March 2 on a northeast Iowa farm previously owned by her grandparents.

“To be honest, if the markets don't come back up, I don't know what’s going to happen or how I'm going to make my land payments,” she said.

The National Suicide hotline is available 24/7 and can be reached at 1-800-273-8255. An online chat option is also available.
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